Tips on How To Give Meaningful Gifts

When you find yourself not knowing how and what to give, just remember these simple pieces of advice.

Wedding welcome gifts

1. Gift what you love.
Get something you would love to receive yourself. In almost all cases, whatever you value yourself is what others would find worthy, too.

Groomsmen wedding gift

2. Make it personal.
There are so many ways to personalize – by engraving gifts with names or monograms & customizing labels and prints.

Groomsmen socks with personalized labelsJack Daniel whiskey custom labels

3. Hand write messages. 
Nothing beats good old handwritten letters that come from the heart.

Personalized gift tags calligraphy

How To Effectively Use Monogram in Gifts

Let’s be honest – We often dismiss many of the favors and giveaways we receive because of their shouting logos and monograms that make the gifts appear tacky and thoughtless. A guest in an event I went to mentioned that she’d rather have more tapas than the cheap souvenir they gave as we left (I know how ungrateful!). I think one of the common mistakes is when we overuse or misuse our opportunity to personalize.

koozies

Photo from WedPics Blog

We suggest a few ways on how to effectively personalize your gifts and favors using monograms.

Know your monogram etiquette.
The traditional three-letter Victorian monograms are the most popular variety people use today. For single men and women, the initials of their names are used to create a monogram; the surname is usually the largest and placed in the middle. If you are giving gifts to a married couple, their initials are combined- the man’s initial goes first followed by the woman’s. But if you are giving gifts to married couples individually, tradition dictates to use the woman’s first name initial, married name initial and then her maiden name initial.

monogram rule for singlesmonogram rules for married couples

Choose the appropriate gift.
Almost everything can be monogrammed – clothing, leather goods, jewelry, even your tiny M&M’s can be personalized! The challenge is to pick the most suitable item in line with your event and based on what the receiver will surely want and would actually use. Always ask yourself – is this item something I would want myself? (Read: Avoid anything glossy).

Bridesmaids boyfriend shirt monogram

Beach wedding

Photo by Ellen Leroy Photography

bridesmaid's monogram bracelets

Be subtle.
Be careful not to overdo the prints, especially if you are using your own initials or names and logos on your giveaways. Use the appropriate font sizes in relation to the size of the favor. Whatever you do, always make sure that they read well.

monogram wedding favorsmonogrammed gift labels

You can never go wrong by making your monogrammed gift simple, useful and fun. Hope this list helps you!

Right or Left, Together or Separate?: How To Wear Your Wedding and Engagement Rings

When my then fiancé (now my husband) proposed to me, I gave him my left hand by default. When we were buying our wedding bands, I was not yet sure which ring finger to put mine on. Fortunately the ring that we decided to get goes really well with my engagement ring, so I thought of wearing them on top of each other. Like any other new bride, I was clueless about ring placements and traditions.

Vein of love
There is really no hard and fast rule on how to wear engagement and wedding rings, but each country and culture have their own set of guidelines and traditions.

Here are some of them:

  • In Catholic and Protestant countries like Russia, Germany, Greece, Spain, Norway and Poland, brides often wear their engagement and wedding rings on the ring finger of the right hand.
  • Those from England, France, Canada, US, Mexico, Ireland, Sweden and other Commonwealth countries generally wear theirs on the ring finger of the left hand.
  • Muslim weddings don’t normally include the practice of exchanging rings but they have already adopted this Western tradition.
  • Jewish couples wear the wedding ring on the left hand, even though it is placed on the right hand during the marriage ceremony. Jewish grooms place the rings on the index fingers of their brides, since that is the finger with which they point to the Torah as they read.
  • Women in Scandinavia wear three rings, one each for engagement, marriage and motherhood.
  • In China, brides wear their wedding bands on the right hand and the grooms on the left. This is based on the custom of ‘nan zhuo, nu you‘ (male left, female right). They believe that since the the woman is in charge of the household, she should wear her ring on the right hand because it has more force and influence.
  • Although rings are usually exchanged in Japanese wedding ceremonies, many Japanese couples choose not to wear their wedding bands after the ceremony.
  • In some parts of India, Hindu women may wear a toe ring or ‘bichiya’ instead of a ring on their finger.
  • Some women from Asia and the West wear the engagement ring on the left hand but move it on the right hand before the wedding ceremony to make room for the wedding ring; while some prefer to store away the engagement ring and wear the wedding ring solo.
Indian wedding

Photo from Pinterest

  • Some women from Eastern Europe wear their engagement rings on the right ring finger and the wedding band on the left ring finger.
  • Some people believe that the ‘correct’ way to wear the engagement and wedding rings together is the wedding band first and then the engagement ring on top of it.  Some believe that wearing the engagement ring on top of the wedding band also ‘protects’ it and keeps it stable and grounded together with their marriage.

Being right-handed, I prefer to free my right hand from any rings just for convenience and comfort. Whether we decide to follow our culture’s tradition or our own personal preference, the most important thing is we treasure and value the symbol that our rings represent – infinite love and fidelity.

The Art of Gifting

One of my primary love languages has always been giving gifts. For some reason, I get really excited about making a friend or a loved one feel happy, valued and loved through gifts. I most especially enjoy the thought process involved and the act of wrapping up a present with nice paper, ribbons and bows.

Today, let me share with you some ideas on making your gifts extra special and on how to use gift giving as an opportunity to exercise creativity.

Beautify with ribbons, flowers and foliage.

Accessorizing with pretty elements like ribbons and fillers will definitely make any gift stand out. Including a succulent or a small bouquet on the side will not only add a pop of color but also life (literally!) to any gift. Feel free to put in a leafy branch from your garden or tie up some satin bows to make your gift look more exciting.

ribbons and roses

Add a personal touch.

Don’t be scared to avoid the standard gift wrappers; create your own! If you’re into painting or drawing, use a simple kraft paper as your canvas and design your own gift wrapper. If you’re into calligraphy or lettering, write the name of the recipient or the occasion you’re celebrating (Happy Birthday, Merry Christmas, Happy Thanksgiving, etc.) across the plain paper according to your style. Anything goes!

personalized gift wrapper

2nd photo from www.brit.co

Follow a theme.

It’s always easier to think using themes and patterns. Think of a color motif or a particular design you like and prepare a gift using that theme. For example, if you have chosen a specific color theme, come up with a list of some favorite things (or food) that the person you’ll give the gift to enjoys, and choose the ones that come in the same color family and put them together in a box or basket. If you feel that buying just a single gift item seems insufficient, this is the best option for you.

gift baskets Vancouver

 

Express your personality by being creative with your gift giving. Reach a new level of thoughtfulness and be greatly appreciated for it. You’ll also feel satisfied after. 100% guaranteed.